BRANDING AND INTERACTION FOR THE CULTURAL SECTOR
Teaching Assistant with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp
College of Design, North Carolina State University

In this Advanced Junior Studio, Graphic Design students explored interaction, identity, and service design specific to the cultural and creative sector. This sector is comprised of individuals, businesses, and non-profit organizations that produce, distribute, and/or sell art and music artifacts, film and television content, architecture, graphic and industrial design, and creative writing. Students proposed visual identity systems, communications, and outreach possibilities as they practiced design research methods.

During the semester, I assisted with student progress through class critiques, small group critiques and individual desk critiques. I provided students with written feedback of their in progress and final work. I also lead improv-style ideation exercises and workshops.

OK, Go Workshop

 

PROJECT ONE: DESIGNING FOR THE WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

Students explored the Warehouse District in downtown Raleigh, where galleries, design studios, independent retail, architecture firms, music venues, independent restaurants, and CAM Raleigh are located. The area is a cultural and creative hub with the recent presence of business centers such as, HQ Raleigh, Citrix, and the agency Baldwin&. This recent growth points to the potential of enriching exchanges among people in commerce, design, and the arts to the betterment of the greater Raleigh area. Students investigated how design thinking and visual design might help foster and inspire these relationships.

Co-directed Student Work with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp:

  Students explored the Warehouse District in downtown Raleigh and the potential for design to create relationships in the area. This project explored anamorphic typography as street signage. The investigation inspired a system for visual identity in print collateral. Student: A. Maclaga, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

Students explored the Warehouse District in downtown Raleigh and the potential for design to create relationships in the area. This project explored anamorphic typography as street signage. The investigation inspired a system for visual identity in print collateral. Student: A. Maclaga, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

 
  The Warehouse District is an area with independent cultural institutions and small businesses. This project explored how space can be used to create places for gathering and be used to identify the district from other parts of Raleigh. Students: K. Applegate, M. Cox, H. Soule, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

The Warehouse District is an area with independent cultural institutions and small businesses. This project explored how space can be used to create places for gathering and be used to identify the district from other parts of Raleigh. Students: K. Applegate, M. Cox, H. Soule, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

 
  Students: M. Miller and M. Fraizer,   Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

Students: M. Miller and M. Fraizer, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

 
 

PROJECT TWO: DEVELOPING A VISUAL IDENTITY FOR SECCA

Students worked on a funded project sponsored by the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem. This non-collecting museum aims to refresh its current Pentagram-designed visual identity. The class also partnered with Raleigh-based branding agency, New Kind, to help with research methods. During this project, I planned and lead an ideation workshop called, "OK,GO".

Codirected Student Work with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp:

  Students worked with the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, developing a new visual identity for the museum. This student created a layered typeface reflecting the everchanging, non-collecting nature of the museum. The typeface provided flexibility to the museum to allow for recognizability, but also allowed for play. Student: B. Bolemon, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

Students worked with the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, developing a new visual identity for the museum. This student created a layered typeface reflecting the everchanging, non-collecting nature
of the museum. The typeface provided flexibility to the museum to allow for recognizability, but also allowed for play. Student: B. Bolemon, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

 
  Students explored how structured design could communicate the abstract ideas that SECCA speaks to. This project employed a coded kit of parts to create a cohesive brand system. Students: M. Cox and M. Fraizer, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

Students explored how structured design could communicate the abstract ideas that SECCA speaks to. This project employed a coded kit of parts to create a cohesive brand system. Students: M. Cox and M. Fraizer, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

 
  Student: E. Eble, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

Student: E. Eble, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

 
  Since the identity of SECCA is dependent of the art it is currently showcasing, this project positions SECCA as a fluctuating system. The student provided SECCA with type configurations as well as guidelines for remixing art imagery to conceptualize and visualize SECCA as a “frame to be filled”. Students: H. Soule, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

Since the identity of SECCA is dependent of the art it is currently showcasing, this project positions SECCA as a fluctuating system. The student provided SECCA with type configurations as well as guidelines for remixing art imagery to conceptualize and visualize SECCA as a “frame to be filled”. Students: H. Soule, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

 
  As part of the re-design process with SECCA, students explored how the identity could evolve over time. This project explored complex patterns and the potential for integrating pattern in print, environment, and digital space. The students create pattern palettes that could be inter-changed, overlayed and scaled as well as a SECCA die-cut for print collateral. Students: K. Applegate and C. Meekins, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

As part of the re-design process with SECCA, students explored how the identity could evolve over time. This project explored complex patterns and the potential for integrating pattern in print, environment, and digital space. The students create pattern palettes that could be inter-changed, overlayed and scaled as well as a SECCA die-cut for print collateral. Students: K. Applegate and C. Meekins, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

 
  Student: M. Miller, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp

Student: M. Miller, Co-directed with Professor Denise Gonzales Crisp