INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN
Lecturer of Graphic Design
Welch School of Art and Design, Georgia State University

This course introduced foundation skills relevant to the discipline of graphic design. Students will developed and expanded their vocabularies in visual communication, exploring basic design elements and principles for solving communication problems across time and space to varied audiences. Students were asked to conduct research, generate ideas specific to form, media, and context.

PROJECT ONE AND TWO: DEVELOPING AN IDENTITY SYSTEM AND CONTEXT SPECIFIC CAMPAIGN

This two part project asked students to develop an identity system for a non-profit organization and then develop a campaign communicating a specific message to a specific audience. Students began by framing the problem through researching their organizations and their goals. This research helped develop concepts for appropriate identity systems as well as context for the messaging.

 

  J. Grubb This student explored a women's empowerment organization, Step-Up. Her messaging campaign consisted of uplifting and encouraging take-aways which culminated in an installation at MARTA public transportation stops. Additionally, she created modular print material to create the larger uplifting message of "I CAN."

J. Grubb
This student explored a women's empowerment organization, Step-Up. Her messaging campaign consisted of uplifting and encouraging take-aways which culminated in an installation at MARTA public transportation stops. Additionally, she created modular print material to create the larger uplifting message of "I CAN."

  K. Duncker-Kastick This student explored the women's organization, Women in Technology. The imagery pulled from micro-chips and other tech devices that we traditionally experience on a small scale. The form and large scale application of this imagery enforced a sense of wonder and awe that can come with experimenting in the field of technology.

K. Duncker-Kastick
This student explored the women's organization, Women in Technology. The imagery pulled from micro-chips and other tech devices that we traditionally experience on a small scale. The form and large scale application of this imagery enforced a sense of wonder and awe that can come with experimenting in the field of technology.

  K. Jordan   This student worked with the organization, Soles for Souls where people are encouraged to donate shoes to the less fortunate. The imagery employed the use of shoelaces as a directional device; the student designed imagery for the sidewalk directing passerby to the posters and to dropoff boxes. The shoelaces were also used as typography in the posters.

K. Jordan
This student worked with the organization, Soles for Souls where people are encouraged to donate shoes to the less fortunate. The imagery employed the use of shoelaces as a directional device; the student designed imagery for the sidewalk directing passerby to the posters and to dropoff boxes. The shoelaces were also used as typography in the posters.

  M. Jones   This student chose to work with Food, Water and Watch and conservation society. The vibrant W.A.T.E.R posters will be placed along the running and biking trails of the Atlanta Beltline, a popular outdoor spot central to Atlanta. The H20 poster will be the leading poster and will be placed along the beginning of the experience. Thereafter, you will see the word, water, spelled as you cycle or run. The letters on the posters are arranged so that they give a sense of movement and fluidity, evoking a sense of water. The posters provide a second read giving about water use.  The pavement extension of the posters offers interaction and is divided into specific content blocks. As people pass over the beltline they will experience the installation over time.      

M. Jones
This student chose to work with Food, Water and Watch and conservation society. The vibrant W.A.T.E.R posters will be placed along the running and biking trails of the Atlanta Beltline, a popular outdoor spot central to Atlanta. The H20 poster will be the leading poster and will be placed along the beginning of the experience. Thereafter, you will see the word, water, spelled as you cycle or run. The letters on the posters are arranged so that they give a sense of movement and fluidity, evoking a sense of water. The posters provide a second read giving about water use.  The pavement extension of the posters offers interaction and is divided into specific content blocks. As people pass over the beltline they will experience the installation over time.